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The sound of cooking

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Please note: as I don’t have a TV, I haven’t seen any cooking programs. Therefore. what I tell you below might be common knowledge except for me.

I ran into a German Michelin star chef yesterday. He had an interesting story on how he manages his kitchen. First of all, there is total silence by the staff. The only words spoken are when he announces the choices of the customers and when the meals are due (‘plate xyz ready in 2 minutes’). Secondly, he approves each plate and if the food is not good he throws it away, no matter how long the customer has to wait. Great food comes first.

Thirdly, as he has got a good reputation, many ambitious people want to work for him. This makes it relatively easy to attract great staff.

I asked him how he manages to get his team to such a level of perfection. He claims it’s easy. Once the recipes are invented they cook it together a couple of times, each member of the team notes what he/she has to deliver and when, the rest is execution.

For me, the bigger lesson was that many more (not all) businesses could be run this way. It ‘just’ takes a great chef to get there.

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2 Comments

  1. Anonymous says:

    It probably works for cooking, because there you essentially follow a repetitive process – recipes. It takes time to master one, get all the ingredients right, perfect amounts. Once that’s achieved, you do the same over and over again.Won’t work so well with software development though. Here you constantly face challenges and even when you try things like code reuse or design patters, in almost 100% of cases you have to customize these to your own needs. This all requires plenty of communication, brainstorming sessions and design.

  2. Anonymous says:

    <html><body bgcolor="#FFFFFF"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="-webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(26, 26, 26, 0.296875); -webkit-composition-fill-color: rgba(175, 192, 227, 0.230469); -webkit-composition-frame-color: rgba(77, 128, 180, 0.230469); "><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="-webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(26, 26, 26, 0.292969); -webkit-composition-fill-color: rgba(175, 192, 227, 0.230469); -webkit-composition-frame-color: rgba(77, 128, 180, 0.230469); "><span class="Apple-style-span" style="-webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(26, 26, 26, 0.292969); ">I’m not saying that software development would be better if the programmers stop speaking to each other.&nbsp;And each software project is different. But at a high level&nbsp;<span class="Apple-style-span" style="-webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(26, 26, 26, 0.296875); ">it is a process as well (business needs, technological feasibility study etc.). In any case, if each member of the team knows exactly what to do is unlikely to do harm anywhere.</span></span></span></div></span><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="-webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(26, 26, 26, 0.292969); -webkit-composition-fill-color: rgba(175, 192, 227, 0.230469); -webkit-composition-frame-color: rgba(77, 128, 180, 0.230469); "><span class="Apple-style-span" style="-webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(26, 26, 26, 0.296875); "><br></span></span></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="-webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(26, 26, 26, 0.292969); -webkit-composition-fill-color: rgba(175, 192, 227, 0.230469); -webkit-composition-frame-color: rgba(77, 128, 180, 0.230469);"><br></span></div><div><div><br></div></div><div><br>Op 19 nov. 2010 om 21:01 heeft</div></body></html>

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